Bangsamoro Peace Agreement Tagalog

The long-standing insurgency of Muslims in the Mindanao and Sulu archipelagos has been an urgent national security issue for the Philippines. Several peace agreements were concluded, but their implementation was usually a problem. The recent agreement, the Bangsamoro Peace Process between the Philippine government and the Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF), aims to create an autonomous region of Bangsamoro by passing the Bangsamoro Basic Law (BBL). More importantly, if the Philippines does not take this opportunity to achieve peace within the framework of this agreement with the MILF, there will be almost no group left for the next round of talks. Based on a SWS poll, more Filipinos agree that the next president should implement the Bangsamoro agreement. The CAB is a 12-page text document that constitutes the final peace agreement between the GPH and the MILF. According to President Aquino, it is the agreement that “can finally seal a real and lasting peace in Mindanao.” [16] The peace agreement provides for the creation of an autonomous region for the Muslim population of the southern region of Mindanao. It will have a power-sharing agreement with the central government, which will allow its own rulers to control most of its own natural resources and revenues. Elections are expected to be held by mid-2016. The main objective of the Lumads is that of the press areas; they oppose the integration of their territories into any peace agreement. It should be borne in mind that the earthly claims of Moro and Lumad are not completely mutually mutually excluded. Therefore, if the Bangsamoro Autonomous Region made changes to any of the Lumades` positions, they would resist definitively.

The resulting peace agreement contains a series of gender considerations in favour of a transitional government and a strengthening of the role of women in the future. For example, the agreement contains provisions on the integration of women into new institutional mechanisms and suggests that women`s economic participation is an essential element of a comprehensive national strategy for post-conflict growth. [15] On the other hand, the Malaysian government has strongly condemned any terrorist activity and expressed its unequivocal support for peace negotiations between the Moro rebels and the Philippine government, instead of helping the rebels, as Malaysia did in 1968 after the Jabidah massacre. [10] At the regional security conference held in April 2003 in Makati, Metro Manila. . . .